Showing posts tagged sunset

The sun was showing her fatigue and as she slipped down behind the trees she left a moiré pattern on the water.  All around the bay lights were flicking on like fireflies in a forest.  The water lapped gently against the hull as the tide pushed in and I could see tiny pearls of dew collecting on the dinghy and the deck.  

It was time to go in.  

We lay down in the salon, we didn’t want to miss the moon.

I smile like The Cheshire Cat when I look back at these photographs.  

I smile because 

(a) I took them — which means I was out there.  We were out there.  We crossed the Atlantic on our 43’ sailboat.  Crazy.  There were times when I wondered why we were doing it.  It was rough.  We kept watch each night for weeks — without sleep — dodging squalls with wind gusts upwards of 35 knots.  The days were not much better.  We had a following sea and we could not let it catch us.  

We had to watch our back.  

We couldn’t slow down.

"There are perfectly good aeroplanes," I said to Robb one night after throwing the cockpit cushions down the companion way (for the third time) and slamming the hatch closed so that the torrential rain would not flood down below and then quickly grinding in the genoa sheet before the sail could be mauled by the wind, "there are aeroplanes."

"But I’m scared of heights," he said and smiled while his knuckles turned white with his grip on the wheel.

I smile because

(b) I survived to tell the tale.

… and the sunsets over the Atlantic Ocean.

Sunset at Lund Harbour, B.C., Canada.

Far From the Maddening Wind

What a difference compared to the blustery Caribbean.

5 am

8 am

noon

3 pm

5.30pm

7pm

8pm

Sunset across the Bahama Banks.

All Work and No Play

Dreaming about cruising?  Read on.

Oh yes,

we saw sunsets 

and palm trees

and drank pitchers of punch.

BUT

It was not always so easy —

There was cleaning…

and fishing

and washing

and barbecuing.

All very hard work.

As was the passage planning  

and 

checking

the weather,

not to mention 

the hours the Skipper spent

taking a very close look at the charts.